A website produced by H:MC21 to promote homeopathy and defend the right of people in the UK to choose homoeopathy within the NHS

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drugalchemy

Almost every "scientific" argument which is used against homeopathy today was used (and answered) within 50 years of the discovery of homeopathy's principles. [...] And the only really new argument is fundamentally flawed.

drugmicroscope

Hahnemann developed three scales of potentisation, one of which usually acts in a very different way from the other two. If there were nothing in the remedies, the action would be the same regardless of the method used.

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Myths about homeopathy 4:

"There is nothing in the remedies"

This is a popular myth, and it relies on believing that the science of physics does not exist. The argument used is that when substances are diluted in the process of making potentised remedies, there comes a point when no molecule of the original substance is left. This is calculated by using Avogadro's number (the number of carbon-12 atoms in 12 grams of carbon), and the 12c potency is regarded as the one where no original substance is left in the remedy. However, provings demonstrate that potencies much higher than this cause effects, and so clearly the argument based on chemistry is not sufficient.

When remedies are potentised they are not only diluted, they are also succussed (banged, or shaken vigorously), and banging is known to make iron magnetic, a property which cannot be identified by the methods of chemists but only by those of physicists. Homeopaths have always stated that some property in the remedy is enhanced by the banging, and Hahnemann investigated the different effects consequent on varying the number of succussions and the rate of dilution. As a result he developed three scales of potentisation, one of which usually acts in a very different way from the other two. If there were nothing in the remedies, the action would be the same regardless of the method used, so this tends to confirm the view that it is incorrect to assume that remedies can be explained by chemists.

More recently it has become known that water has some very peculiar properties, and some scientists have been investigating whether these can explain potentisation.